What hit and run penalties might I face in Florida?

Under Florida Statute § 316.062, it is illegal for a driver to flee after an auto accident, otherwise known as a hit and run. This rule covers fender benders, serious crashes, as well as accidents involving pedestrians or non-vehicle property. Drivers who fail to stop face hefty hit and run penalties.

What do I have to do after I stop?

If any person involved in the crash was injured or if there was damage to a vehicle or other property, then the drivers involved must immediately pull over and share their:

  • Name, address, and contact information
  • Vehicle registration information
  • Driver’s license and insurance information

Additionally, if someone was injured in the accident, you have a duty to provide reasonable assistance, such as calling 9-1-1. If no other person is present at the scene of the crash, such as when a driver strikes a parked car, then the driver must file a report with the police, or at least leave the necessary information in a note for the other party.

What are the penalties for hit and run accidents involving property damage?

Per Florida Statute § 316.061, the penalties in Florida for a hit and run that causes only property damage, such as backing into a parked car or running over a mailbox, include:

  • A fine of $500
  • Up to 60 days in jail

This type of hit and run is a second-degree misdemeanor in Florida.

What is the penalty for leaving the scene of an accident that causes injuries? 

The penalties for a hit and run that causes injury to another person vary depending on the seriousness of the injury. According to Florida Statute § 316.027, hit and run accidents involving injury are third-degree felonies in Florida. The penalties include any combination of:

  • Up to five years in prison
  • A $5,000 fine
  • Driver’s license revocation

Hit and run accidents involving serious injury are second-degree felonies in Florida. Serious injury means any injury that creates a substantial risk of death, disfigurement, or loss or impairment of the function of a body member or organ.

The penalties include any combination of:

  • Up to 15 years in prison
  • A $10,000 fine
  • Driver’s license revocation

Leaving the scene of an accident that causes death is a first-degree felony in Florida. The penalties include any combination of:

  • Up to 30 years in prison
  • A $10,000 fine
  • Driver’s license revocation

If the driver involved in a hit and run that results in the death of another was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, there is a minimum prison sentence of four years.

Contact Goldman Wetzel Today for Help with Your Hit and Run Charges

If you or a loved one has been charged with a hit and run offense in Florida, contact Goldman Wetzel today for a free consultation. When you involve us early, we will explore opportunities to mitigate charges or penalties, including preventing points on your driver’s license, and can help determine if insurance covers any of the loss or damage.

Call us at 727-828-3900 to set up a consultation.

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